Recently in Baked Goods Category

Sour Cream Scones A slightly healthier scone that has a nice nutty flavor from the whole wheat flour. For early-morning events, make the dough the night before, shape it, and refrigerate. Then in the morning, all you need to do is pop them in the oven. Serve with lemon curd (homemade, it's really easy!) or butter. 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour (about 6 3/4 ounces)
2/3 cup whole wheat flour (about 3 ounces)
1/3 cup packed brown sugar
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
2/3 cup reduced-fat sour cream
3 tablespoons butter, melted and cooled
1 large egg
1/3 cup dried currants or raisins
Cooking spray
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Preheat oven to 400°.

Lightly spoon flours into dry measuring cups; level with a knife. Combine both flours and the next 5 ingredients (through salt) in a large bowl; stir well with a whisk.

Combine sour cream, butter, and egg in a small bowl. Add sour cream mixture to flour mixture, stirring just until moist. Stir in currants.

Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface; knead lightly 6 to 12 times with floured hands. (Dough will be crumbly.) Divide dough in half. Pat each half into a 6-inch circle on a baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Cut each circle into 6 wedges; do not separate.

*Note: dough can be made the day before up to this point and refrigerated overnight covered with plastic wrap.*

Combine 1 tablespoon granulated sugar and cinnamon. Lightly coat top of dough with cooking spray. Sprinkle with cinnamon mixture. Bake at 400° for 15 minutes or until lightly browned.

Nutritional Information per scone
Calories: 175, Fat: 4.8g

From Cooking Light

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Butter a baking sheet lightly.

Sift the dry ingredients into a large bowl. Cut the butter into 1/2 inch pieces and add them to the dry mix. Use your hands to rub the butter between your fingers, breaking it into smaller bits. Continue until butter is in sizes ranging from rice grains to flattened peas. Do this quickly so that the butter stays cold.

In a small bowl, whisk together the buttermilk and egg until thoroughly combined. Scrape the buttermilk/egg mix into the dry mixture, and mix until barely combined.

Use a pastry scraper or spatula to transfer the dough to a well floured surface. The dough may be too sticky to handle; if it is, dust it with flour and fold it together a few times. Divide the dough into 2 pieces. Flour your hands and pat each piece of dough into a disk about 3/4 inch thick and 7 inches in diameter. (Note: this makes 8 large scones. If serving a crowd, divide into 4 smaller circles)

Cover one disk with jam. Top with the other disk and press down gently so the dough settles into the jam. Brush the dough lightly with melted butter and sprinkle with sugar. Use a sharp knife to slice the circle into 8 triangular wedges like a pie. Carefully place the wedges on the baking sheet, leaving a few inches between them.

Bake the scones for 22-26 minutes, rotating the sheets halfway through. The scones are ready when their tops are golden brown and some of the jam has bubbled over onto the pan. To keep the scones from sticking to the pan, slide a thin spatula underneath them while they're still warm and move them to a baking rack.

From:Good to the Grain by Kim Boyce

whole_wheat_pita.jpgI've tried a few pita recipes, and this one is hands-down my favorite. The whole wheat flour adds flavor without weighing the dough down, and a bit of yogurt keeps the texture soft. Wonderful with homemade falafel or chicken souvlaki.

1 tablespoon sugar
1 package dry yeast (about 2 1/4 teaspoons)
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons warm water (100° to 110°)
2 1/4 cups white flour
1 cup whole-wheat flour (best with whole wheat pastry flour), divided
2 tablespoons 2% Greek-style yogurt
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
3/4 teaspoon salt
Olive oil cooking spray
Dissolve sugar and yeast in 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons warm water in a large bowl; let stand 5 minutes. Weigh or lightly spoon flours into dry measuring cups; level with a knife. Add bread flour, 3 ounces (about 3/4 cup) whole-wheat flour, yogurt, oil, and salt to the yeast mixture; beat with a mixer at medium speed until smooth. Turn the dough out onto a floured surface. Knead dough until smooth and elastic (about 10 minutes); add enough of remaining whole-wheat flour, 1 tablespoon at a time, to prevent dough from sticking to hands (dough will feel sticky). Place dough in a large bowl coated with cooking spray, turning to coat top. Cover and let rise in a warm place (85°), free from drafts, for 45 minutes or until doubled in size.

Place bread stone in oven and preheat the oven to 500°. If you don't have a bread stone place the oven shelf on the lowest rack.

Divide dough into 8 portions. Working with one portion at a time, gently roll each portion into a 5 1/2-inch circle. Bake on bread stone or place 4 dough circles on each of 2 baking sheets heavily coated with cooking spray. Bake, 1 sheet at a time, at 500° for 8 minutes or until puffed and browned. Cool on a wire rack.

Original Recipe

noknead_peasant_bread2.jpgThis is my favorite recipe from the cookbook "Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes a Day" because it has a slightly buttery flavor from the rye and wheat flours added to the usual recipe. The method is simple: mix everything together, let it rise once for a couple of hours, then keep in the fridge until you want to bake. On baking days, it only takes about 1 hour and 20 minutes to make a loaf, which really isn't bad for real yeast bread. Steam and a baking stone help the crust develop a crackling artisan texture. This dough can be used for other recipes as well - calzones are one of my favorite alternatives when we've had our fill of plain bread. 

3 cups lukewarm water
1 1/2 tablespoons yeast (or 2 packets)
1 tablespoon Kosher salt (original recipe calls for 1.5)
1/2 cup rye flour
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
5 1/2 cups all purpose flour
cornmeal for pizza peel
-Makes 4 1-pound loaves but can be doubled or halved.

Mix
Mix yeast and salt with the water in a 5 quart (20 cup) container (best if it has a lid but is not airtight).
Mix in remaining dry ingredients without kneading, using a wooden spoon or mixer.
Cover (not airtight) and allow to rest at room temperature until dough rises and collapses (or flattens on the top) approximately 2 hours.
The dough can be used immediately after the initial rise, though it is easier to handle when cold. Refrigerate in a lidded (not airtight) container and use over the next 14 days.

Shape
On baking day, dust the surface of the refrigerated dough with flour and cut of a 1 pound (grapefruit-size) piece. Dust with more flour and quickly shape it into a ball by stretching the surface of the dough around the bottom on all four sides, rotating the ball a quarter-turn as you go.

Rest
Allow to rest and rise for 40 minutes on a pizza peel or cutting board that is well covered in cornmeal. Note: you won't see much change in size during this time.

20 minutes before baking, preheat the oven to 450 degrees F, with a baking stone placed on the middle rack. Place and empty (metal!) pan or broiler tray on any other shelf that won't interfere with the rising bread.

Bake
Sprinkle the loaf liberally with flour and slash a cross, scallop or tic-tac-toe pattern into the top, using a serrated bread knife. Leave flour in place for baking, tap some of it off before slicing.

Slide the loaf directly onto the hot stone. Pour 1 cup of hot tap water into the broiler tray and quickly close the oven door. Bake for about 35 minutes, or until the top crust is deeply browned and firm. Allow to cool before slicing.

From: Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes a Day
banana_blueberry_muffins.jpgA delicious, fairly lowfat use for overripe bananas and fresh blueberries. Note: use white flour only, wheat overwhelms the delicate banana flavor.

2 ½ cups sifted flour
2 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp. baking soda
½ tsp. salt
1 cups sugar
1 egg, beaten
½ cup orange juice
1/2 tsp. vanilla (optional)

2 Tbsp. butter, room temp.
1 ½ cups (or more) chopped fresh blueberries
½ cup chopped walnuts (optional)
3 ripe bananas, mashed

Sift the dry ingredients (flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt) together.  Then add the sugar, egg, oj, and butter. Whisk together.  Fold in the bananas and blueberries.

Pour into a 9"X5" greased loaf pan or a lined muffin tin and bake at 350 degrees for 1 ¼ hours (for loaf) or 20 minutes (for muffins).  Remove from pan when done and cool on rack. 
banana_coffee_bread.jpgThis is a much lighter version of banana bread than Daniel's traditional cake-like version here. The texture is more bread-y, but it is nonetheless packed with banana flavor, with depth from the addition of a little strong coffee. It also makes wonderful french toast after a couple of days.

1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour
1/2 cup whole wheat flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon allspice (or 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon)
3/4 cup sugar

2 tablespoons melted butter or oil
1 large egg white
1 large egg
1 cup banana puree, from about 2 very ripe medium-sized bananas
1/2 cup buttermilk or sour cream
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 shot (about 3 tablespoons) of strong coffee, cooled (or mix 1 tablespoon instant espresso powder with  3 tablespoons of hot water)

Add in: pecans and/or chocolate chips

Butter a rectangular bread pan or a 9-inch square pan. Preheat the oven to 350°F.

Sift together in a bowl the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and allspice (or cinnamon). Mix in the sugar.

In a large bowl, mix together the butter, egg white, egg, banana puree, buttermilk or sour cream, vanilla and espresso.

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture and stir in the wet ingredients with a spatula until almost mixed. Add in your additions and stir until just combined, but don't overstir: stop when any traces of flour disappear.

Scrape the mixture into the prepared pan. Bake the bread for 60 minutes or the square cake for 40 minutes. The center must feel lightly-springy and just done.

Cool on a baking rack. Keeps well for 3-4 days, or can be frozen, wrapped in plastic wrap, for a few months.

Original recipe


crunchygranola.jpgI've tried a lot of different granola recipes, but this one is hands-down my favorite. The combination of quick cooking and old fashioned oats in this recipe, combined with a smaller than usual amount of oil, make perfectly crunchy clusters - like boxed cereal but better tasting.

1 1/2 cups old-fashioned rolled oats
1 cups quick cooking oats
1/2 cup oat bran
1/4 cup vegetable oil
1/3 cup sliced almonds
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
1/3 cup packed dark brown sugar
1/4 cup mild honey
Pinch cinnamon
Pinch salt (a flaky sea salt is best)

1 cup mixed dried fruit of your choice (I used figs, dates, raisins, and cranberries)

Put oven rack in middle position and preheat oven to 375°F. Stir together all ingredients except the fruit in a large bowl until combined. Spread mixture evenly on a large (17-by 12-inch) shallow baking pan lined with parchment paper and bake, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, 30 to 35 minutes, but checking every five minutes after the 15-minute mark because it burns quickly. Transfer granola, in pan, to rack to cool, about 45 minutes. Let cool completely to keep clusters from breaking apart

Either store granola separate from dried fruit in airtight containers at room temperature, or store in the freezer with fruit mixed in.

Original recipe

I'm usually not one for trying out a brand new recipe on Thanksgiving. I like classics you can count on. But these just looked so good I couldn't pass them up. They came out light, fluffy, and perfectly golden brown. I should have taken a picture, I know. But don't worry, I'm sure I'll make them again. ;)

1 cup coarsely chopped walnuts
3½ cups (or more) bread flour
1 tablespoon light brown sugar
1½ teaspoons quick-rising dry yeast
1½ teaspoons salt
1½ cups milk
2 tablespoons vegetable oil, plus additional for coating bowl
1 large egg
1/2 cup sweetened dried cranberries
Nonstick cooking spray
1 large egg, beaten to blend (for glaze)
Raw (turbinado or demerara) sugar

1. Stir the walnuts in a dry skillet over medium heat until toasted, about 5 minutes. Set aside to cool.

2. Mix 3½ cups bread flour with the brown sugar, yeast and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment. Warm the milk in a small saucepan over low heat until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the milk registers 95 degrees F. Add the oil; remove from the heat. Add the milk mixture and 1 egg to the flour mixture. Mix on low speed until a wet coarse ball forms, about 1 minute. Add the nuts and the cranberries. Replace the paddle attachment on the mixer with a dough hook. Mix dough on low speed until smooth, elastic, and slightly tacky, adding more flour by the tablespoonfuls as needed, about 4 minutes. Transfer the dough to a floured surface and knead for about 2 minutes.

3. Lightly oil a large bowl. Shape the dough into a ball; place in the prepared bowl, turning to coat with oil. Cover with plastic wrap and let the dough rise at room temperature until almost doubled in volume, 1¾ to 2 hours.

4. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper. Transfer the dough to an unfloured surfaced; divide into 12 equal pieces. Shape each piece of dough into a smooth round ball. Transfer the rolls to the prepared baking sheet, spacing them apart. Spray the rolls with nonstick spray. Cover loosely with plastic wrap; let rise at room temperature until 1½ times original size, about 1½ hours. Brush rolls with egg glaze; sprinkle with raw sugar. Let rise 15 minutes longer.

5. Meanwhile, position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 425 degrees F.

6. Place rolls in oven; reduce oven temperature to 400 degrees F and bake 7 minutes. Rotate baking sheet; continue to bake rolls until golden and slightly firm to the touch, about 8 minutes longer. Cool completely on a cooling rack.

*Note: You can wrap these in foil and place in an airtight bag and freeze for up to 2 weeks. Thaw the rolls at room temperature. If desired, you can rewarm the rolls wrapped in foil in a 350 degree F oven for about 10 minutes.

makes 16 large rolls

original recipe

wholewheatbread2_sm.jpg

I have to say I think I've found the perfect sandwich bread. Half-whole wheat, sweetened just slightly with molasses and honey, lightened with oats, and perfectly sliceable. Makes two loaves - eat one and freeze or gift the other. If freezing, slice first so you can toast individual slices, and wrap in aluminum foil.

2  cups  warm water (100° to 110°)
3  tablespoons  molasses
1  (1/4-ounce) envelope active dry yeast
3  cups  all-purpose flour, divided
2 1/2  cups  whole wheat flour
1  cup  uncooked regular oats
1  tablespoon  salt - yes, really a tablespoon
1/4  cup  honey
3  tablespoons  olive oil
up to 6  tablespoons  all-purpose flour
Vegetable cooking spray
Prep: 25 min.; Stand: 5 min.; Rise: 1 hr., 45 min.; Bake: 35 min.

Combine first 3 ingredients in a 2-cup glass measuring cup; let yeast mixture stand 5 minutes.

Combine 2 cups all-purpose flour, whole wheat flour, oats, and salt.

Beat yeast mixture, 1 cup all-purpose flour, honey, and olive oil at medium speed with a heavy-duty electric stand mixer until well blended (or with a wooden spoon, which works fine). Gradually add whole wheat flour mixture, beating at low speed until a soft dough forms.

Turn out dough onto a well-floured surface, and knead 9 minutes, adding additional all-purpose flour (up to 6 tablespoons) as needed. Don't add too much here, the dough should be slightly sticky. Place dough in a large bowl sprayed with cooking spray, turning to grease top of dough.

Cover bowl of dough with plastic wrap, and let rise in a warm place (85°), free from drafts, 1 hour or until doubled in bulk.

Punch down dough, and divide in half. Roll each portion into a 13- x 8-inch rectangle on a lightly floured surface. Roll up each dough rectangle, starting at 1 short side, jelly-roll fashion; pinch ends to seal. Place loaves, seam sides down, into 2 (8 1/2- x 4 1/2-inch) loaf pans sprayed with cooking spray.

Cover loosely with plastic wrap, and let rise in a warm place (85°), free from drafts, 45 minutes or until almost doubled in bulk. Remove and discard plastic wrap.

Bake at 350° for 30 to 35 minutes or until loaves sound hollow when tapped and are golden. Cool in pans on wire racks 10 minutes. Remove loaves from pans, and cool on wire racks.

Makes 2 loaves, 12 slices per loaf (serving size: 1 slice)

Calories:150 (14% from fat)
Fat: 2.4g (sat 0.3g,mono 1.4g,poly 0.4g)
Original recipe

artisan_noknead_sm.jpgAh, Cook's Illustrated...They always have the best techniques, tips, and recipes, it just always seems to take an entire day to pull one off. They are true weekend recipes: lots of time, but usually worth it. This recipe is their version of the ubiquitous "no-knead bread" baked in a Dutch oven that has been floating around online. It's kind of funny because the whole idea behind the original recipe was that it was easy...and, well, this is not. Not fast anyway. This version bakes up a perfectly textured artisan loaf of bread in only...11 hours! Still, the bread was really good. Bakery good. It might be worth it.

3 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 tsp. instant yeast
1 1/2 tsp table salt
3/4 cup + 2 tbs water, room temperature
1/4 c. + 2 tbs mild beer (something typically American)
1 tbs white vinegar

Whisk flour, yeast and salt in a large bowl. Add water, beer, and vinegar. Using rubber spatula, fold mixture, scraping up dry flour from bottom of bowl until shaggy ball forms. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let sit at room temperature for 8-18 hours.

Lay 12x18 inch sheet of parchment paper inside 10-inch skillet and spray with nonstick cooking spray. Transfer dough to lightly floured work surface and knead 10-15 times. Shape dough into ball by pulling edges into middle. Transfer dough, seam side down, to parchment-lined skillet and spray surface of dough with cooking spray. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rise at room temperature until dough has doubled in size and does not readily spring back when poked with a finger, about 2 hours.

About 30 minutes before baking, adjust oven rack to lowest position, place 6-8 qt. Dutch oven (with lid) on rack, and heat oven to 500 degrees. Lightly flour top of dough and make one 6-inch long, 1/2 inch deep slit along top of dough. Carefully remove pot from oven and remove lid. Pick up dough by lighting parchment overhang and lower into pot (let excess parchment hang over pot edge). Cover pot and place in oven. Reduce oven temperature to 425 degrees and bake covered for 30 minutes. Remove lid and continue to bake until loaf is deep brown, 20-30 minutes longer. Carefully remove bread from pot, transfer to wire rack and cool to room temperature, about 2 hours.
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